Chef Notes: The Art of the Stock

Chef Notes: The Art of the Stock

Chef Amanda is back with her fast and easy way to make homemade stocks. Yes, you heard me: stocks. Sounds scary, I know. But, thankfully, we have Amanda to make even the most daunting kitchen task approachable. Here’s her quick and dirty (Ok, it’s not messy at all) lesson on homemade stocks….

One of the first things we learned in culinary school was the art of making a proper stock, absolutely necessary if you’re making a consommé or reducing down to a demi glace.  If you’re like me, you don’t always have time for proper.  So if you’re making soups or simmering rice or vegetables the following tips can keep you “in stocks” all the time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, save those little bits, ends, and peels of most vegetables.  I like to keep a zip top bag in the freezer, then, whenever prepping veg, grab it and throw in the peels/ends of just about anything including onion, garlic, cauliflower, broccoli, squash, celery, carrots, tomatoes, even apple and pear cores. You should  leave out vegetables that are covered in wax like turnips and rutabaga and starchy vegetables like potatoes. In separate bags, keep the leftover bones of chicken, pork, and beef.  And if you have access to whole white fish, save the fish heads and bones. Also save shellfish shells.

Once you’ve emassed a large zip top bag of bones and veggie scraps, throw it all into a large pot.  Toss in a few whole peppercorns, a couple bay leaves, a handful of whatever dried herbs you have on hand, a small can of tomato paste (or not) and you’re well on your way.  (If you are vegetarian and want a vegetable stock, just leave out the bones and fill your pot with bags of vegetables.) Cover with cold water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for a few hours.  Strain and freeze.  Once you get used to saving all those bits you’ll find that you’re constantly using them.  Happy Stocking!!!

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2 Comments

  1. jan Clements
    June 14, 18:54 Reply

    I have used this method off and off for a number of years. As a destitute Navy wife, I dressed up many a “poor Man’s” meal by cooking it in stock.

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