What’s So Great About Purslane

What’s So Great About Purslane

Do you know what Purslane is? I’m going to guess it’s flattering on all figures? No, wait..the whole family can play it? Or, and this is my final guess, it will heat your home all winter for ½ the money you currently pay. I actually have no idea what purslane is. But, the gift that keeps on giving, is the Men’s Health article I pilfered last week (in a totally professional and non-plagiarizing sort of way!) says it’s one of the “10 Best Foods You Aren’t Eating.” And they would be right, I’m not. Are you?

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By the way, spell check was adamant that purslane should be changed to either Portland or praline so apparently we’re not alone. Considering its classification as a “broad leaved weed” can we really be blamed. Well, we need to get over our disdain for eating weeds because, according to Men’s Health, “purslane has the highest amount of heart-healthy omega-3 fats of any edible plant”, according to researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio. The scientists also report that “this herb has 10 to 20 times more melatonin—an antioxidant that may inhibit cancer growth—than any other fruit or vegetable tested.” Even though, it has a slightly sour and salty taste I’d be willing to try it.

Okay, Men’s Health, you’ve convinced us, we will now add purslane to the rotation. Now, how do we eat it? Please say dipped in chocolate, please say dipped in chocolate! “In a salad. The leaves and stems are crisp, chewy, and succulent, and they have a mild lemony taste.”  However, you can also stir fry the green or even cook it like spinach but I think I’m just going to stick to my original idea and dip it in chocolate.

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